Canon EOS 60Da announced

After 7 years, Canon announced a new dslr model designed with astrophotography in mind. Few of you may remember the previous model of that kind – the Canon EOS 20Da. The EOS 20Da featured a live view. Yes, a live view that was virtually unknown among SLRs at the time. Nowadays it comes standard, but the 60Da like the 60D makes it a lot more useful with its LCD being able to move around. It comes handy when the camera is mounted to a telescopic lens.

EOS 60Da is basically 60D but with its infrared filter modified. Modified in a way so it doesn’t screen out so much “hydrogen-alpha” light, produced by excited hydrogen atoms. It lets in approximately three times the amount of hydrogen-alpha red as a regular 60D, so it can capture better photos of energetic nebulae. I know, it all makes sense to you. Let’s just say if you are very interesting into shooting stars in Space with you Canon, EOS 60Da may be your weapon of choice. I say may be because you can also take those pictures with the regular 60D and save yourself a 600 $. In the end it all depends on your knowledge on the matter and your needs.

Below are the sample photos taken with 60D and 60Da probably mounted on some kind of telescope (source: petapixel.com)

 

 

So we can all clearly see the difference in the redness of details and although I don’t think this is worth $600 extra, astro photographers might disagree. Not being even close to an astro expert I would leave any debates to more competent individuals. We can only repeat some statements that we came across on the web. Like when some say that  their advice would be to get a cheaper, less megapixel camera with bigger individual pixels, and to remove the IR filter that is in front of the sensor. So one may also do that to a 60D camera but then you wouldn’t be able to shoot normal pictures during daylight. Instead you would get that crazy cool infrared look on your daylight pictures.

The basic specifications remained the same like on the original 60D: an 18MP APS-C sensor, 9-point AF, and a 3-inch LCD. With the camera you get a remote controller adapter and an AC adapter. It will be available for $1,499.

You may look at 60Da as a $600 pricier 60D or as an astro photographic all-around dslr with no alternative. And like with all multipurpose items there are some negative aspects. It is neither the best daylight camera nor it will be the best camera for astrophotography.

About ivan

Ivan is a freelance photographer, an adventure traveler and a car enthusiast. Besides driving all around the continent and taking car shots, he enjoys action photography and has been a part of many sporting events in Europe.
  • http://www.facebook.com/john.shutz John Shutz

    I agree with your last paragraph. I think it would make more sense to modify a lower end Canon and use it as a dedicated AP body.

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